Thinking Box

Basic English Grammar - Chapter 15: Possessives

CHAPTER 15 - Possessives

15-1 Possessive nouns

  • (a) My friend has a car. My friend's car is blue.

    SINGULAR NOUN / POSSESSIVE FORM:
    friend / friend's

    (b) The student has a book. The student's book is red.

    SINGULAR NOUN / POSSESSIVE FORM:
    student / student's

    To show that a person possesses something, add an apostrophe (') and -s to a singular noun.
    POSSESSIVE NOUN, SINGULAR:
    noun + apostrophe (') + -s

  • (c) The students have books. The student's books are red.

    SINGULAR NOUN / POSSESSIVE FORM:
    students / students'

    (d) My friends have a car. My friends' car is blue.

    SINGULAR NOUN / POSSESSIVE FORM:
    friends / friends'

    Add an apostrophe (') at the end of a plural noun (after the -s).
    POSSESSIVE NOUN, PLURAL:
    noun + -s + apostrophe (')

15-2 Possessive: irregular plural nouns

(a) The children's toys are on the floor.
(b) That store sells men's clothing.
(c) That store sells women's clothing.
(d) I like to know about other people's lives.

Irregular plural nouns (children, men, women, people) have an irregular plural possessive form. The apostrophe (') comes before the final -s.

REGULAR PLURAL POSSESSIVE NOUN:
the students' books

IRREGULAR PLURAL POSSESSIVE NOUN:
the women's books

15-3 Possessive pronouns: mine, yours, his, hers, ours, theirs

  • (a) This book belongs to me.
    It is my book.
    It is mine.

    (b) That book belongs to you.
    It is your book.
    It is yours.

    (c) That book is mine.

    INCORRECT: That is mine book.

  • POSSESSIVE ADJECTIVE:
    my / your / her / his / our / their
    POSSESSIVE PRONOUN:
    mine / yours / hers / his / ours / theirs

    A possessive adjective is used in front a noun: my book.
    A possessive pronoun is used alone, without a noun following it, as in (c).

15-4 Questions with whose

  • (a) Whose book is this?
    -> Mine. / It's mine. / It's my book.
    (b) Whose books are these?
    -> Rita's. / They're Rita's. / They're Rita's books.

    Whose asks about possession.

    Whose is often used with a noun (e.g., whose book), as in (a) and (b).

  • (c) Whose is this? (The speaker is pointing to a book.)
    (d) Whose are these? (The speaker is pointing to some books.)

    Whose can be used without a noun if the meaning is clear, as in (c) and (d).

  • (e) Who's your teacher?

    In (e): Who's = who is.
    Whose and Who's have the same pronunciation.

评论